Climate Change: What Antarctica’s ‘Doomsday Glacier’ Means for the Planet

The pandemic has had many effects, one being a slight reduction of GHG emissions: estimates suggest there is around 415ppm of CO2 in our atmosphere. Why this matters is that some have calculated that 450ppm is the level at which efforts to limit temperature rise above 2C becomes seriously challenged. The article below is really well researched and illustrates the potential effects of global warming on sea levels, focusing on a joint US-British scientific study of the Thwaites Glacier. This is located in Antarctica, home to 90% of the earth’s ice, some 2km thick. Research findings will be highly instructive: it is estimated that if the glacier melts it will cause sea levels to rise by 65 centimeters. Scientists warn, however, the glacier won’t melt in isolation and broader effects could mean seas rise by 2-3 meters, with catastrophic physical consequences for cities, food production, and generally increased weather volatility.

Financial Times:
Climate Change: What Antarctica’s ‘Doomsday Glacier’ Means for the Planet »